Force Carbing A Little Debbie

One of the things a home brewer has to struggle with is patience. Everything from waiting the 70 minutes for your mash to the three weeks for fermentation to the time it takes for bottles to carbonate all require patience.

Sometimes there are opportunities to skip ahead in the process.

There are a couple devices avaliable that allow you to force carbonate small amounts of your beer, assuming you have kegging equipment.

The first device I bought was the Carbonator.

This is basically a ball lock keg post that you screw onto your average soda bottle. You then apply a little CO2 and purge the air while it fills. Shaking the bottle allows the CO2 to mix into your beer and carbonate it.  Right now I have one of these in use on a 2 liter bottle of the left over base beer for my hard root beer.

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The best thing about the Carbonator is that if you keg you already have the required connections to pressurize the bottle.  Just pop a fitting off of a keg and use that for a quick second.

The only drawback is that if you need more than a couple they are a little spendy. That is what led me to the next thing I’m going to show you.

Another setup that I found is considerably cheaper to do multiple bottles. It’s only drawback is that you will need to dedicate a CO2 line to it’s filling adapter.

Kent Carbonation Cap

Kent Carbonation Barb

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The blue piece gets attached to a CO2 line and the white cap with o-ring go onto the bottle.

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In my kegerator I have two dedicated lines for force carbing. One with a standard ball lock fitting and one with this.

Tonight I decided that I would force carb a small sample of the Debbie Does Amarillo Dirty Blonde Ale.

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After it chills I’ll be able to get a good sense of what the final product will taste like.

Even if you aren’t a brewer these caps, along with a CO2 source,  make for a great way to preserve unfinished portions of beer from opened growlers.


One thought on “Force Carbing A Little Debbie”

  1. A growler usually doesn’t last long enough to worry about re carbonating. But that’s a great idea for the sipers out there.

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